Capmaari Movie Review

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Capmaari movie review: Capmaari is an eyesore and downright trash.

Capmaari movie director: SA Chandrasekar (SAC)
Capmaari movie cast: Jai, Vaibhavi Shandilya, Athulya Ravi
Capmaari movie rating: 0.5 star

I am a huge fan of K Balachander and Balu Mahendra. Both of them directed movies that had non-conformist ideas and not-so-easy plots. If K Balachander directed Aval Oru Thodarkathai, Manathil Uruthi Vendum, Sindhu Bhairavi and Kalki that centred around complicated relationships, Balu Mahendra, on the other hand, came up with the terrific Sathi Leelavathi, Marupadiyum and Rettai Vaal Kuruvi. How does a woman handle her husband’s extra-marital affair is the crux of Rettai Vaal Kuruvi, and Balu Mahendra dealt with the plot in a dignified way—that even today we find it interesting to watch and discuss. It’s amazing how those characters commanded respect in a relationship that was usually not seen in that era. Having caught such films, Capmaari is an eyesore and downright trash.

Everything that could go wrong with a film has gone wrong in Capmaari, a movie that defies any justification for its existence. The protagonist (played by Jai) ends up marrying a girl he “casually” slept with on a train journey. Both the guy and the woman were high on alcohol. What happens when he repeats the same post-marriage with another girl, forms the crux of the story. Towards the end, we get a social message—consumption of alcohol is not only injurious to health but also “life”. We find crass double entendres sprinkled all over the script, and not to forget, one of the characters takes a dig at the Me Too movement. Oh, also, there’s ‘avanaa nee’ brand of comedy—which is disgusting. If SA Chandrasekhar thought “comedy” was his biggest strength, I’d say the humour wells have dried up, as a result of not coping with the changing times. The veteran filmmaker might have directed over 70 movies in Tamil, Telugu, Kannada and Hindi. But Capmaari, I’d say, is his worst film to date.

Jai’s character hunts for a pharmacy at night because he’s unable to find a pack of condoms at home. This situation leads to a song; I am not kidding. I am quite sure the film couldn’t have been funny even at a script level. So why and how did it get made?

During the interval, I was wondering if SA Chandrasekhar had written this around the time he was trying to launch his son Vijay as the hero. In one of the scenes, Jai even imitates Vijay. To be honest, Vijay should eternally thank his stars because he never ended up starring in Capmaari. And, why are such films being made in 2019?

Truth be told, there were moments when I had no idea what was going on. Athulya’s character puts a timetable. Guess for what? She suggests that Jai sleeps with her on Monday, Wednesday and Friday—so that the alternative nights can be spent with his “legally” wedded-wife. Everything about the so-called triangular love track in Capmaari is utter bullshit and I once again ask myself, “Did I find any trace of romance in this highly misleading adult romantic comedy’?” Could a film be filled with such nonsense without even realising how nonsensical it is?

I can go on and on about awfully-written dialogues and bad screenplay. I don’t want to, because I know it hardly matters. The storyline of Capmaari isn’t the biggest problem—but largely its sub-standard quality of storytelling. The female characters, Vaibhavi Shandilya and Athulya Ravi are equally problematic as Jai. For instance, they refer to condoms as “gloves”. It is not about judging women for their relationships or what they do or speak. But, how they are shown and the way it’s played out.

Gone are those days when filmmakers explored ideas that he or she felt passionate about. Maybe, you need to watch Capmaari to know how not to write or make a film. Besides the constant objectification of the women characters, what grossed me out was the suggestive camera angles and needless skin show. The girls are written as glam dolls without any personality or individuality. Their primary reason for existence is to have sex, but nothing else.

Jai’s character comes with no redeeming quality just as this film itself. Naturally, expecting sanity and logic from Capmaari feels pretty far-fetched. I wish the makers had spent half the effort on the script, instead of spending on songs, sets and costumes. And, Capmaari is just another needle in the ever-growing haystack of bad films in Tamil cinema. In an interview, SA Chandrasekar had said, “I have been following the lives of many youngsters in the past few years to enhance my script.” Even God doesn’t seem to know what it is.

I heard Jai’s next is Yenni Thuniga (Think, plan well and execute), inspired by a Thirukkural couplet. But the question is, Jai, will you? You need solid time to undo the sloppy mess you created, man.

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